Course Design Workshop / Saturday, 18 MAR 2017

EVENT DESCRIPTION

Join NEOOC’s mapping guru Bob Boltz and a few others to learn more about course design, and what it takes to prepare great, but appropriately challenging, maps for all participants – from beginner to advanced orienteers. Topics will include basic design principles, designing for the beginner and advanced orienteer, and how to check your design for trouble areas. You’ll learn how to use Purple Pen, a course design software, as part of the workshop.

Workshop Objective: Introduce experienced orienteers to the task of designing appropriate courses for all levels of orienteering.

The Course Design workshop features both hands on work with maps (old school) – handy for when beginning to think about an event, and instruction on the Purple Pen software (a freely available course design program used by many course designers.) We’ll also cover how to properly mark a course (during preparation), and how to hang and retrieve controls (part of setting a course).

Feel free to bring your own laptop with Purple Pen loaded already (see link below), and any old maps you may have for discussion and review. Bring some note taking materials, and be ready to ask lots of questions. A red pen or marker helps in marking the maps. A red, thin, permanent marker makes a great tool for course design!

Workshop Schedule

  • 9:30 – 11:30 – Course design basics, etc. (classroom)
  • 11:30 – 12:30 – Lunch (on your own) (lots of available locations within 5 minutes)
  • 12:30 – 3:00 – Purple Pen / Design a course using course design software

DATE & TIME & EVENT FEE

  • Saturday, March 18th, 2017
  • 9:30 AM – 3:00 PM (1 hr lunch on your own)
  • $10 for NEOOC Members / $15 for non-members (+ minimal processing fee from Eventbrite)
    • (includes donuts & coffee, instruction, handouts, practice maps, etc.)

REGISTRATION

Please let us know here if you plan on attending:

LOCATION

Kenston Intermediate School’s Innovation Lab
17419 Snyder Rd, Chagrin Falls, OH 44023

STAFFING

  • Workshop Lead & Facilitator – Bob Boltz
  • Assistant Facilitator – Andreas Johansson

WEATHER

This workshop is mainly indoors, but may venture outside if the weather cooperates!

RESOURCES

Mapping: 3D Laser Scans of Britain Reveal Ancient Roman Roads

LIDAR

For the past 18 years, the U.K.’s Environment Agency has used a remote sensing methodcalled LIDAR (short for Light Detection and Ranging) to scan and map 72 percent of England’s surface. The 3D terrain images are used to monitor changing coastlines and model floods. But the maps recently revealed something else: an exciting archaeological find. Within the images, experts spotted miles upon miles of ancient Roman roads that may date back as far as the first century CE.

Roman squads who invaded Britain in 43 CE constructed a series of roads that crisscrossed the country, allowing soldiers to travel hundreds of miles to far-flung forts and settlements. These routes helped solidify Rome’s control over the country’s native Celtic tribes. While some of these paths remain today, many eroded over the centuries, or were obscured by new structures or vegetation.

History buffs regularly search for these “lost” routes, the Times of London reports. Among that group was a 70-year-old retired road engineer named David Ratledge, who has spent almost five decades researching vanished highways in the northwest county of Lancashire.

After the Environment Agency made its LIDAR data sets public via the Survey Open Data Website in 2013, Ratledge examined the maps and spotted a Roman road that connects the towns of Ribchester and Lancaster. According to LiveScience, he previously spent years looking for this particular route, to no avail. Thanks to LIDAR —which can detect differences in the land’s height as little as five centimeters (about 2 inches)—the mystery was finally solved.

“Previously in Lancashire we only had aerial photographs from the 1940s and 1960s to go on, but with photographs features only show up after a drought and we don’t get many of those!” Ratledge said in a press release. “With LIDAR, once you know what to look for, it’s blindingly obvious—you just know you’ve found a road.”

Meanwhile, two archaeologists, Hugh Toller and Bryn Gethin, have used LIDAR data to locate other lost highways, including swaths of a Roman route called the Maiden Way. The Maiden Way once connected the village of Kirkby Thore—which was home to a Roman cavalry camp—with a Roman fort in Low Borrowbridge, Cumbria. Eventually, Toller and Gethin hope to find even more Roman roads using images captured by remote sensing technology. These discoveries may help historians gain a fuller understanding of how Rome once conquered and controlled England.

via http://mentalfloss.com/article/75298/3d-laser-scans-britain-reveal-ancient-roman-roads