Course Design Clinic 2017 | Resources

Thanks for attending today’s Course Design Clinic with Bob Boltz. Here are some of the resources we worked with, along with sample map files, control descriptions, etc.


Purple Pen | Course Design Software

  • http://purplepen.golde.org/ (Download at home. Purple Pen requires Windows XP SP3, Windows Vista SP2, Windows 7, Windows 8, or Windows 10. If you have a Mac, you can run Parallels Desktop to run Windows, and then run Purple Pen.)

Sample Map File | Ritchie Ledges Area

Slides from today | via Bob Boltz

How do I design courses?

Control Descriptions | Mike Minium version

Control Descriptions | Expanded / IOF 2004

Course Design Workshop / Saturday, 18 MAR 2017

EVENT DESCRIPTION

Join NEOOC’s mapping guru Bob Boltz and a few others to learn more about course design, and what it takes to prepare great, but appropriately challenging, maps for all participants – from beginner to advanced orienteers. Topics will include basic design principles, designing for the beginner and advanced orienteer, and how to check your design for trouble areas. You’ll learn how to use Purple Pen, a course design software, as part of the workshop.

Workshop Objective: Introduce experienced orienteers to the task of designing appropriate courses for all levels of orienteering.

The Course Design workshop features both hands on work with maps (old school) – handy for when beginning to think about an event, and instruction on the Purple Pen software (a freely available course design program used by many course designers.) We’ll also cover how to properly mark a course (during preparation), and how to hang and retrieve controls (part of setting a course).

Feel free to bring your own laptop with Purple Pen loaded already (see link below), and any old maps you may have for discussion and review. Bring some note taking materials, and be ready to ask lots of questions. A red pen or marker helps in marking the maps. A red, thin, permanent marker makes a great tool for course design!

Workshop Schedule

  • 9:30 – 11:30 – Course design basics, etc. (classroom)
  • 11:30 – 12:30 – Lunch (on your own) (lots of available locations within 5 minutes)
  • 12:30 – 3:00 – Purple Pen / Design a course using course design software

DATE & TIME & EVENT FEE

  • Saturday, March 18th, 2017
  • 9:30 AM – 3:00 PM (1 hr lunch on your own)
  • $10 for NEOOC Members / $15 for non-members (+ minimal processing fee from Eventbrite)
    • (includes donuts & coffee, instruction, handouts, practice maps, etc.)

REGISTRATION

Please let us know here if you plan on attending:

LOCATION

Kenston Intermediate School’s Innovation Lab
17419 Snyder Rd, Chagrin Falls, OH 44023

STAFFING

  • Workshop Lead & Facilitator – Bob Boltz
  • Assistant Facilitator – Andreas Johansson

WEATHER

This workshop is mainly indoors, but may venture outside if the weather cooperates!

RESOURCES

MAZE-O / Practice Your Skills

Practice your O-skills even when you’re not out in the woods! The Maze-O will challenge your brain, and sense of direction while finding the shortest, or the fastest routes through the mazes. Each turn slows you down, so try for a straighter line through, with the least amount of turns. And who knows, maybe you’ll see something like this in the near future…

If you want to generate your own mazes, go to http://www.mazegenerator.net/ for all the mazes you could ever want!

Here’s an idea…

How to Select an Orienteering Course

by Karen Dennis via OUSA

This article first appeared in the “Beginners’ Clinic” feature in the June, 1995 issue of Orienteering/North America, the magazine of the sport in the United States and Canada. O/NA frequently publishes helpful features such as this one. O/NA is available by subscription, but the best way to receive it is with a membership in the Orienteering USA (United States Orienteering Federation). Karen Dennis is an experienced orienteer, course setter, and mapper.

This is a description of the standard orienteering course levels and the skills required to do each one — ordered from easiest to hardest. This list is to help you decide which orienteering course and/or which training session to select. Above all, remember that orienteering is intended to be fun. Choose the course which challenges your current skill level but is still easy enough to be fun for you.

Course List

  White for the beginner
  Yellow for the experienced beginner
  Orange for the intermediate level orienteer
  Brown shorter course for the advanced orienteer
  Green short course for the advanced orienteer
  Red longer course for the advanced orienteer
  Blue longest course for the advanced orienteer

White Course—for the beginner

Choose this novice course if you are just beginning to orienteer and have had little or no experience. Before starting you should know:

  • how to interpret map symbols and colors (legend).
  • how to orient the map to North using a compass and/or land features.
  • what are the basic objectives (rules) of orienteering competition.
  • what to do when hopelessly lost (how to user a “safety bearing”).

This course is designed to introduce you to, and give you experience in:

  • following land features (“handrails” such as trails, roads and streams)
  • learning to relate the map to features on the ground
  • judging the distance between control locations
  • gaining self-confidence in map reading

Yellow Course—for the experienced beginner

Choose this beginner course if you have had some experience with orienteering and are quite comfortable with the beginner course, or have done a lot of hiking using topographical maps. Before starting you should know:

  • everything listed for the white course above
  • how to read contour lines
  • how to select and follow a “handrail”
  • how to select and use an “attack point”
  • how to interpret a scale and judge rough distance
  • how to take a rough compass bearing
  • how to select a route choice (safer vs. shorter)
  • how to “recover” from an error by backtracking to last known point

This course is designed to introduce you to, and give you experience in:

  • following handrails to an attack point (rather than to the control)
  • taking a bearing from the attack point to the control
  • judging fine distance between the attack point and the control
  • selecting between simple route choices
  • recognizing “collecting features” and “catching features”
  • reading and interpreting contours
  • recovering using attack points and maps features

Orange Course—for the intermediate level orienteer

Choose this intermediate course if you are moderately experienced with orienteering, you have mastered the white course and done a few yellow courses and been very comfortable with them. Before starting you should know:

  • everything listed for the white and yellow courses
  • how to navigate with or without a “handrail”
  • how to select and use “collecting features” and “catching features”
  • how to “aim off”
  • how to “simplify” a map
  • how to follow a compass bearing
  • how to recognize and avoid “parallel errors”
  • how to read IOF control descriptions

This course is designed to introduce you to, and give you experience in:

  • how to navigate cross-country with confidence
  • make route choices (according to your personal strengths and weaknesses)
  • recovering from “parallel errors” and other mistakes
  • fine map reading while traveling
  • visualization of contours
  • judging physical challenges and pacing yourself

Green Course—short course for the advanced orienteer

Choose this competitive level course if you are an experienced orienteer and have done several orange courses with confidence. Before starting you should know:

  • everything listed for the other courses
  • how to “pace count”
  • advanced techniques such as attacking from above, contouring, thumbing your map, red light, yellow light, green light
  • how to evaluate your own physical and orienteering skills
  • extensive recovery techniques

This course is designed to give you experience in:

  • pacing yourself (physically)
  • recognizing the challenges presented to you by the course setter
  • perfecting your orienteering skills
  • discrimination of mapping details
  • Brown Course—shorter course for the advanced orienteer
    Red Course—longer course for the advanced orienteer
    Blue Course—longest course for the advanced orienteer

These courses have the same difficulty as green, and vary only in the length of the course and in the physical challenge. Brown is shorter and less physically demanding, red is longer, and Blue is the longest and toughest advanced course.

Mapping: 3D Laser Scans of Britain Reveal Ancient Roman Roads

LIDAR

For the past 18 years, the U.K.’s Environment Agency has used a remote sensing methodcalled LIDAR (short for Light Detection and Ranging) to scan and map 72 percent of England’s surface. The 3D terrain images are used to monitor changing coastlines and model floods. But the maps recently revealed something else: an exciting archaeological find. Within the images, experts spotted miles upon miles of ancient Roman roads that may date back as far as the first century CE.

Roman squads who invaded Britain in 43 CE constructed a series of roads that crisscrossed the country, allowing soldiers to travel hundreds of miles to far-flung forts and settlements. These routes helped solidify Rome’s control over the country’s native Celtic tribes. While some of these paths remain today, many eroded over the centuries, or were obscured by new structures or vegetation.

History buffs regularly search for these “lost” routes, the Times of London reports. Among that group was a 70-year-old retired road engineer named David Ratledge, who has spent almost five decades researching vanished highways in the northwest county of Lancashire.

After the Environment Agency made its LIDAR data sets public via the Survey Open Data Website in 2013, Ratledge examined the maps and spotted a Roman road that connects the towns of Ribchester and Lancaster. According to LiveScience, he previously spent years looking for this particular route, to no avail. Thanks to LIDAR —which can detect differences in the land’s height as little as five centimeters (about 2 inches)—the mystery was finally solved.

“Previously in Lancashire we only had aerial photographs from the 1940s and 1960s to go on, but with photographs features only show up after a drought and we don’t get many of those!” Ratledge said in a press release. “With LIDAR, once you know what to look for, it’s blindingly obvious—you just know you’ve found a road.”

Meanwhile, two archaeologists, Hugh Toller and Bryn Gethin, have used LIDAR data to locate other lost highways, including swaths of a Roman route called the Maiden Way. The Maiden Way once connected the village of Kirkby Thore—which was home to a Roman cavalry camp—with a Roman fort in Low Borrowbridge, Cumbria. Eventually, Toller and Gethin hope to find even more Roman roads using images captured by remote sensing technology. These discoveries may help historians gain a fuller understanding of how Rome once conquered and controlled England.

via http://mentalfloss.com/article/75298/3d-laser-scans-britain-reveal-ancient-roman-roads