Short & Intermediate XC | Kendall Lake @ Pine Hollow | Sunday April 2, 2017 | 11:30A – 1P

Event Description

Join us for short and intermediate courses in the Kendall Lake area. We start at Pine Hollow, off of Quick Road for a new start / finish location. Bring your running shoes (with cleats, perhaps!), and get ready to stretch those legs!

The Kendall Lake area features rolling hills, with plenty of vistas, up and downs, and is a great place for orienteering. Fred Mailey is designing a few different courses, and you’ll be able to run one of all – your choice. Most of them will be quick, and will let you sample various levels of technical orienteering, along with our usual beginner to advanced levels. However, most of the courses will be shorter than normal, so a good time to explore as much as you want.

Date & Time & Event Fee

  • Sunday April 2, 2017
  • Registration starts at 11:30 AM.
  • First start at 12 PM Noon. Last start at 1 PM.
  • Standard fee – Members: $5.00 Nonmembers: $10.00 (cash only at the event, please!)

Our club charges a nominal fee for events. The fees mainly cover the cost of printing the maps and the upkeep of the club’s supplies, and for developing new maps. Special events may have additional fees. Fees listed are for a single person orienteering alone or a group orienteering together using a single map. Additional maps can be purchased from the registrar for $3, if sufficient supply is available.

Location

Pine Hollow Trailhead
5465 Quick Rd, Peninsula, OH 44264

Staffing

  • Event Director – KJ Rufener
  • Course Design – Fred Mailey
  • Registration – Bob Turanchik
  • Greeter – Marcia Mauter
  • Control Setter – Howard Montgomery (we could always use help picking up, too!)

Weather

Courses Available

Short & Intermediate Courses Available – come stretch your legs!

There will be courses from WHITE (beginner & short) to RED (advanced & long) and a few in between. Fred, the course designer, has designed courses for this event that are a little shorter in general, and many club members plan on running more than one. Why not work your way up?

Questions?

Angus “Fred” Bond | October 1954 – March 2017

Angus was an incorporating member of NEOOC and helped draft the club’s very first
map, which was at Hell Hollow in the Lake Metroparks. Angus was an officer and
volunteer for many years before moving to continue his work in aerospace
engineering. He was felled by a stroke on February 13th and succumbed several weeks
later. He is survived by his wife, Xing Liang, daughter Beini, sons Rick and Donald.

The above photo is from Bob Boltz, and he writes:

The photo is “of Angus preparing to haul a load of ice cream to the beaver pond east
of Kendall Lake. Angus got the idea when he noticed that the control code was ‘DQ.’
He always had tremendous energy and wisdom. Every event was better when Angus
was involved.”

Results | Snow-O 2017 | February 12th, 2017

Recap

Wow! What an event, and what a turnout! With 41 timed individuals or groups out and about in the woods, it was a busy morning registering and starting runners at NEOOC’s first event of the year. Sure, we had “planned” for snow, and some colder temperatures. Ice cream sandwiches (and maybe the use of snow shoes) were promised, but neither happened! We had temps in the mid-40s instead, overcast, with wet and muddy ground conditions. In other words, a perfect day for orienteering!

First off, a huge thanks to the small number of volunteers that made the day go smoothly. Thanks to John and Chris Nazier for acting as Manatoc liaisons and guides (and chief fire captains), as well as their Venture Crew for setting controls on Saturday, and for picking up on Sunday afternoon. Guy Russ did an amazing job as chief registrar and cashier, and managed the flow of participants with skill and elegance. Thanks to the small group from Unity Lutheran Church that came out to help pickup controls on Sunday. Andreas Johansson, event director for the day, wore many additional hats (course design, setting controls, etc.), including rescue team and shuttle driver… And thank you to Chris Bergdorf and Camp Manatoc for the excellent site venue!

A small team tackled WHITE and YELLOW, including a few Boy Scouts. All reported having had a great time, and said they’d return for our event in April. Owen Anderson took first on WHITE with 51:29, and Team Feaser topped YELLOW with 55:51, followed by NEOOC regular Frank Mahne at 87:28! Shoutout to Team Esis for being first-time orienteers, for getting the whole family involved!

Many took advantage of the ORANGE course, which offered a bit more distance than YELLOW, but required a few off-trail legs that tripped up a few. Not many returned sans-mud… Kai Getrost came in first, in 52:34, followed by Bernard Marcucci at 63:04. Team Mauler went a bit off-course, and were rescued by a big blue truck towards the end of the day!

On GREEN, Fred Mailey performed with 74:15. Members KJ Rufener and NEOOC President Howard Montgomery both did GREEN (Howard did it backwards!) and had hairsplitting times with 106:28 and 106:27, respectively! Wow!

Action on the RED course was overwhelming, with 15 competitors, several of which had signed up for pre-printed maps beforehand via Facebook (the idea being, less foreknowledge of the route by having to plot it yourself). First out was NEOOC’s Todd Pownell who took third, bested by Randy Mitchell with 63:25, and winner Dave Kostansek with 57:10. Well done Dave for running an excellent race, and not using the road from Octagon south! Next time, we’ll mark it with the uncrossable boundary symbol, as the design was to force runners to navigate the long leg 6 – 7 of about 1,100 meters!

Feedback was positive overall, and we ended the day with plenty of snacks and even heart shaped donuts in honor of the upcoming Valentine’s Day. Many stuck around for a few minutes by the open fire to discuss routes, lamenting falls in the mud, and wondering where the snow was.

Most controls were cleaned up by 4:30PM, and the rest will be retrieved this week. Why not give us a hand next time, if you can? Picking up controls is one of the best ways to learn to better read the map since the time crunch isn’t there, and you have some time to really study the micro details of the map versus the terrain. And you often can collect controls from other courses than the one you ran. And, if you’re lucky like Andreas was, you might run into a rafter of native Cuyahoga Valley turkeys! And deer. Always deer.

We’ve added some resources below, including the full splits, Attackpoint data (if you’re logging there), and RouteGadget, where you can add / load your track to compare with others. See you next time, on April 1, 2017 at Kendall Lake.

Resources & Maps

A few folks have asked for the routes and maps from the event. Here are some files that may help. Note – they are not the full maps, and possession of the maps do not entitle you to access of the area. Camp Manatoc is a Boy Scout reservation, and requires prior permission to enter, and is generally not open to the public. Please be respectful of this.

Results

White Course: 9 controls | 2.2 km | 0 m
  1 Owen Anderson                  51:29
  2 Perkins Slifer                 88:28
  3 Team Esis                      92:57

Yellow Course: 11 controls | 2.7 km | 0 m
  1 Team Feaser                    55:51
  2 Frank Mahne                    87:28
  3 McKibben Parker                87:56
  4 Fran Kern                      105:24
  5 Chuck St.John                  105:28

Orange Course: 10 controls | 3.2 km | 20 m
  1 Kai Getrost                    52:34
  2 Bernard Marcucci               63:04
  3 A Shannon                      79:30
  4 Jeff Whitbeck                  81:29
  5 Sanae Rogers                   81:31
  6 John Chesna                    91:38
  7 Team Loya                      110:54
  8 Dawn Zwetzig                   112:25
    Marcia Mauler                  DNF

Green Course: 11 controls | 4.2 km | 20 m
  1 Fred Mailey                NEO 74:15
  2 KJ Rufener                     106:28
  3 Rich Perrenoud                 120:14
    Johnson Witalis                DNF

Backwards Green Course: 11 controls | 4.2 km | 20 m
  1 Howard Montgomery              106:27

Red Course: 8 controls | 5.4 km | 50 m
  1 Dave Kostansek                 57:10
  2 Randy Mitchell             NEO 63:25
  3 Todd Pownell                   66:54
  4 Bob Turanchik                  81:49
  5 Steve Johnson              NEO 88:38
  6 Phill Wadsworth                101:55
  7 Fred Lusi                      103:44
  8 Eric Marotta                   109:23
  9 Yaki Barak                     115:25
 10 John Rasinski                  118:42
 11 Dan Freeman                    124:12
 12 Gil Even                       128:58
    James Price                    DNF
    Richard Davies                 DNF
    Team Jefferis                  DNF

Pictures

[envira-gallery id=”1607″]

Splits, AttackPoint, and RouetGadget

Course Design Workshop / Saturday, 18 MAR 2017

EVENT DESCRIPTION

Join NEOOC’s mapping guru Bob Boltz and a few others to learn more about course design, and what it takes to prepare great, but appropriately challenging, maps for all participants – from beginner to advanced orienteers. Topics will include basic design principles, designing for the beginner and advanced orienteer, and how to check your design for trouble areas. You’ll learn how to use Purple Pen, a course design software, as part of the workshop.

Workshop Objective: Introduce experienced orienteers to the task of designing appropriate courses for all levels of orienteering.

The Course Design workshop features both hands on work with maps (old school) – handy for when beginning to think about an event, and instruction on the Purple Pen software (a freely available course design program used by many course designers.) We’ll also cover how to properly mark a course (during preparation), and how to hang and retrieve controls (part of setting a course).

Feel free to bring your own laptop with Purple Pen loaded already (see link below), and any old maps you may have for discussion and review. Bring some note taking materials, and be ready to ask lots of questions. A red pen or marker helps in marking the maps. A red, thin, permanent marker makes a great tool for course design!

Workshop Schedule

  • 9:30 – 11:30 – Course design basics, etc. (classroom)
  • 11:30 – 12:30 – Lunch (on your own) (lots of available locations within 5 minutes)
  • 12:30 – 3:00 – Purple Pen / Design a course using course design software

DATE & TIME & EVENT FEE

  • Saturday, March 18th, 2017
  • 9:30 AM – 3:00 PM (1 hr lunch on your own)
  • $10 for NEOOC Members / $15 for non-members (+ minimal processing fee from Eventbrite)
    • (includes donuts & coffee, instruction, handouts, practice maps, etc.)

REGISTRATION

Please let us know here if you plan on attending:

LOCATION

Kenston Intermediate School’s Innovation Lab
17419 Snyder Rd, Chagrin Falls, OH 44023

STAFFING

  • Workshop Lead & Facilitator – Bob Boltz
  • Assistant Facilitator – Andreas Johansson

WEATHER

This workshop is mainly indoors, but may venture outside if the weather cooperates!

RESOURCES

Snow-O 2017 (aka Rain-O) / Sunday FEB 12, 12PM – 2PM

Event Description

Join us for a potentially snowy and cold somewhat warm and rainy first event of the year at Camp Manatoc. We’ll feature WHITE and YELLOW (beginner) courses, an ORANGE course (advanced beginner), and GREEN and RED (advanced) courses. The beginner courses will stay near campus, whereas the advanced courses will travel up and around one of the lakes. Beautiful views are guaranteed, and you’ll be sure to stay warm from the typical terrain in Cuyahoga Valley, with lots of up and down, mixed with flatter sections to stretch the legs on.

The ground will be hard from the winter weather, and possibly covered in snow. It will most likely be wet, and a bit muddy. Route choice will be important. Good shoes with as much traction possible would be helpful on any of the courses. Snow shoes are ok, too…

Park in the main parking lot. Join us by the fire before or after the race to talk strategy, or review how you did out in the woods. Treats will be available post-race, including (a first-annual perhaps?) ice cream!

Date & Time & Event Fee

  • February 12th, 2017
  • Registration starts at 11:30 AM.
  • First start at 12 PM Noon. Last start at 2 PM.
  • Standard fee – Members: $5.00 Nonmembers: $10.00 (cash only at the event, please!)

Our club charges a nominal fee for events. The fees mainly cover the cost of printing the maps and the upkeep of the club’s supplies, and for developing new maps. Special events may have additional fees. Fees listed are for a single person orienteering alone or a group orienteering together using a single map. Additional maps can be purchased from the registrar for $3, if sufficient supply is available.

Location

Camp Manatoc Boy Scout Camp
1075 Truxell Rd, Peninsula, OH 44264

  • MAPhttps://goo.gl/maps/EnEwbz9pwTB2
  • Parking: Park in main parking lot, then travel on foot to registration / start area.
  • Registration & Finish at the Craft shelter (adjacent to main parking lot)

 

Staffing

  • Event Director – Andreas Johansson
  • Course Design – Andreas Johansson
  • Registration – Guy Russ
  • Greeter – OPEN (why not help volunteer?)
  • Control Setter – Andreas Johansson & Scouts (John Nazier)

Weather

Courses Available

WHITE, YELLOW, ORANGE, GREEN, RED

Sample Map

Questions?

Volunteer with NEOOC in 2017!

Help us make it a great 2017 for NEOOC by volunteering some of your time running an event.
Most of the jobs are easy to learn, and there are plenty who would love to show you how.

Taking registrations, greeting orienteers, or setting controls help tremendously. Let us know what you’re willing to help out with by filling out this form:

The Five Key Skills of Orienteering

via Quantico Orienteering Club http://qocweb.org/content/five-key-skills-orienteering

When you can use the following five techniques skillfully, you will be able to find any control on any orienteering map in the world. On some legs you may use only one technique, but for most legs you will need to combine several, or maybe all five, techniques.

Before we get to the five key skills, here is an insight into using compass bearings: Accuracy deteriorates as distance increases.

Our compasses aren’t surveyors’ tools – any bearing you measure on the map will likely be off by one or two degrees. As you follow the bearing, you are likely to unconsciously veer off another degree or two. Sometimes these errors will offset each other and you’ll end up exactly on target. But at other times they will compound each other. Over a 100 meter leg, a 3 degree error will put you 5 meters off course. You will likely still be able to see your target. But over a 500 meter leg, the same error would put you over 25 meters off course. You might very well not be able to see the control.

So use your compass wisely as you apply the Five Key Skills: Use it to orient your map, and use it to aim yourself in a general direction, but when you use it to try to pick a precise line to a specific point, keep the distance as short as possible.

The Five Key Skills

  1. Pick out a CATCHING FEATURE that will let you know if you’ve gone too far. When planning your route, look on the map a short distance beyond the control you are heading for, and pick out a big, distinct feature that you can’t fail to recognize. If you arrive at this catching feature, you will know you have overshot the control, and can turn around and go back. It will “catch” you and keep you from wandering too far past your control.
  2. Follow a HANDRAIL. Even if it were pitch dark, you would be able to easily negotiate a winding staircase if you just put your hand on the handrail and followed where it led. Handrails in orienteering are features that are you can follow just as easily. Trails and roads are the most obvious, but you can follow fences, streams, ditches, the edges of fields, and other long, narrow features just as easily. Following a “handrail” takes much less concentration than following a compass bearing. Also, since the handrail is illustrated on the map and a compass bearing isn’t, following the handrail makes it much easier to keep track of exactly where you are.
  3. When following a compass bearing to get to a distinct point near or on a handrail, try AIMING OFF. If you pick a compass bearing that aims directly at the precise point you are heading for, if you err even slightly you won’t know if the feature you want will be on your left or your right as you approach it. By deliberately aiming to one side of the feature, you can confidently predict which side it will appear on. This technique works best when the feature is on or very near a handrail – for example a boulder near a stream. If you aim right at the boulder, but don’t see it when you hit the stream, you won’t know whether to go upstream or downstream to look for it. However, if you deliberately aim a little upstream of the boulder, if you don’t see it when you hit the stream you will know to turn downstream to look for it.
  4. If the control isn’t on or near a handrail or other large, distinct, easily identifiable feature, choose an ATTACK POINT that you are confident that you can identify and take a compass bearing from there. Some controls, especially on advanced courses, are placed in the middle of large areas of bland, nebulous terrain, with no trails, streams, reentrants, or other distinct feature to help you keep track of where you are. An example would be a man-made pit in the middle of a flat flood plain, or a boulder on a smooth, even hillside. You have no choice but to follow a compass bearing to find it. But remember that when following a compass bearing:
    1. The bearing is only good if you really are where you think you are when you start following the bearing.
    2. Your accuracy in following the bearing decreases as the distance you travel increases.

    So pick the closest feature that you are sure you can find, and go in from there. Note: using an attack point is also useful in less challenging situations, where you don’t have to use a compass. In many cases you may be able to use some other directional scheme, like “straight downhill from the trail intersection” or “up the left reentrant from the reentrant junction” or “clockwise around the marshy area from where the stream comes in”.

  5. Use COLLECTING FEATURES to keep track of where you are. The most successful orienteers know exactly where they are at all times. They do this by constantly identifying features as they pass them, and locating them on the map (or “collecting” the features). Here are two types of situations where using collecting features is particularly helpful:
    1. The “I’ll just head west until I hit the trail and then turn right” situation. This can be a good strategy, but if the trail has grown indistinct, or is covered with leaves, or is hidden under a fallen tree, you could walk right over it without noticing. Or you might inadvertently veer southwest instead of west, and hit a different trail. By identifying the terrain and features as you go (“There should be a reentrant coming up on my right, and then there will be a marshy area off to my left”), you will know when you are coming close to the trail, or when you are starting to drift off your line.
    2. The “I have no choice but to follow a compass bearing a long way” situation. Break the long leg up into several shorter sections between identifiable features, even if it means following a zig-zag course. It often is faster to go a slightly longer, zig-zag distance, following several different compass bearings short distances from one distinct feature to another with great accuracy, rather than to go the shorter straight route on a single bearing with your accuracy deteriorating the closer you get to the control.

Race Results / Python Adventure Race 2016 / CVNP – Manatoc / Saturday, October 8th

RECAP

Reported by Bob Boltz, NEOOC Map Coordinator and Python Lead Planner

Searching for the Python – 2016

Cool temps and some sun made for perfect conditions for the first Python Adventure Race/Rogaine/Mega-Score Event.

After breakfast, maps were handed out at about 7 AM. Thirty-one 12 hour and twenty 6 hour teams studied their maps to develop a strategy to maximize points given the constraints of time, distance and topography. Teams were given instructions and at 8 AM a horn signaled the start of the adventure.

Because rain had threatened through the night, I had saved one control for Saturday morning. It was a five foot long life-like fish pillow that I gave the clue sheet description, “Something Fishy Here.” I drove to the side of the road near the location and quickly hauled the fish through the woods to the control location. After hanging the fish and the flag, I had the idea of taking pictures of folks as they encountered the checkpoint. I ran to the car, got my camera and ran back. Before I could get there I spied Todd Pownell speeding away from the control. Within the next twenty minutes, eight more teams visited the fish.

olivia-and-the-fish

When things slowed down, I returned to Python headquarters to find the volunteers starting to greet the first of twenty-four 3 hour teams that would search for a subset of The Python venue covered 5 of our existing maps: Boston Run, Ritchie Ledges, Kendall Lake, Boy Scout Camps and Oak Hill.

Numerous areas that connect the maps were added. These include the area either side of the Cuyahoga, Horseshoe Pond and the Pine Lane area both north and south of Rt. 303. The 1:12,500 map was divided into three overlapping 11X17 sheets with clues printed at the bottom of each sheet. Waterproof paper was used. A small map was included that depicted the corn maze at Szalay’s Farm Market where one of the 69 flags was located.

One experienced orienteer confessed to spending an hour navigating the corn maze!

All fifty-one of the 6 and 12 hour teams were back in time so no penalties were imposed. Many had only minutes to spare! All told, there were over 110 participants from 10 states! Some reported routes that covered well over 30 miles. Robert Minto and Eric Olsen, both running solo, found all the controls in less than 12 hours.

We received many verbal and Facebook thanks for an event well done. The only disappointments were a lack of a group photo before the mass start and two water controls that ran dry before the end of the event. I am deeply sorry for the pain that caused. I was just lazy and only put four gallons of water at each of the water stops. If we do this again we will know better.

python-trophy

One potential blunder was avoided a week before the event. At the point where the map was ready to print, I awoke in the middle of the night realizing that although I had successfully stitched together all the existing maps, I had forgot to rotate the map 8.2 degrees clockwise to compensate for magnetic declination. This caused more than an extra day of computer work to correct the problem. Ouch!

This event could not have happened without a fine group of volunteers.

  • Control Setters: Mark Stypczynski, Steve Hughes, Fred Mailey, Steve Hendrix, Bob Boltz
  • Event Director Because No One Else Volunteered: Randy Mitchell
  • Campmaster & Chef: Chris Bergdorf
  • Camp Liason: Ivan Redinger
  • Python Headquarters Staff: Karen Birt, Gary& Rebekah Burden, Kathy Jo Rufener, Hazel Barton & Sanae Rogers (a special thanks to Sanae for seeing that everything was OK with the cabins at checkout Sunday morning. That included mopping out the shower house!)
  • Control Collectors: Randy Mitchell, Andreas Johansson, Ken Lohiser, Chris Powers, Sanae Rogers, Howard Montgomery, Bob Boltz
  • Course Designer and Mapper: Bob Boltz
  • Honorary Photographer on loan from the Western PA Raccoongaine: Alexis “Sherpes” Rasinski (see his photos here!)

IF ANY 6 or 12 HOUR PARTICIPANTS DIDN’T GET THE PYTHON SOUVENIR SHOWN ABOVE, LET US KNOW.

RESULTS

2016 Python 12 Hour overall ranking

Place  Name Time in Score Class State
1 Robert Minto 7:42 2190 Master’s Men IN solo
2 Eric Olsen 7:47 2190 Master’s Men IL solo
3 Todd Pownell 7:23 2100 Master’s Men OH solo
4 Running with Samson 7:33 2100 Master’s Mixed . team
5 Stephen Tarry 7:55 2050 Veteran Men NH solo
6 Raccoongainer (Alexis) 7:33 2040 Master’s Men PA solo
7 Sparkles and Jerkface 7:51 2030 Elite Mixed NY team
8 Phast Generation 7:47 2020 Veteran men VT team
9 Steve Johnson 7:42 1860 Veteran men OH solo
10 Thunder Road 7:47 1850 Master’s Mixed OH team
11 Nightcrawlers 7:57 1680 Veteran Mixed NY team
12 Bee-Ringer 7:36 1640 Master’s Mixed PA team
13 Campbell Rabbits 7:51 1630 Master’s Women VA team
14 B & O trekkers 7:44 1550 Veteran Men MD/OH team
15 The Donner Party 7:48 1490 Elite Men OH team
16 Phillip Wadsworth 7:55 1490 Veteran Men OH solo
17 The Wandering Rocks 6:22 1440  Master’s Men NY team
18 Yaki Barak 7:50 1400 Master’s Men PA solo
19 Bob Turanchik 7:43 1390 Master’s men OH solo
20 Feral Children 7:50 1210 Master’s Men NY/OH team
21 Kathy Jo Rufner 7:28 1200 Master’s Women OH solo
22 Klemo 7:42 1200 Master’s Mixed . team
23 Salamander 4:01 1100 Master’s Men OH team
24 John Rogers 7:03 1090 Master’s Men OH solo
25 Swamp Things 7:44 1080 Elite Men OH team
26 Aaron Combs 7:22 1030 Elite Men OH team
27 Gordon Huang 8:00 890 Elite Men PA solo
28 Damselfly 7:25 780 Master’s Mixed OH team
29 Backtrackers 7:25 780 Veteran Women NY team
30 Jay Williams 7:25 680 Veteran Men OH solo
31 Richard Davies 7:42 680 Veteran Men OH solo

 

2016 Python 12 Hour by category

Place  Name Time in Score  Class State
1 The Donner Party 7:48 1490 Elite Men OH team
2 Swamp Things 7:44 1080 Elite Men OH team
3 Aaron Combs 7:22 1030 Elite Men OH team
4 Gordon Huang 8:00 890 Elite Men PA solo
1 Sparkles and Jerkface 7:51 2030 Elite Mixed NY team
1 Robert Minto 7:42 2190 Master’s Men IN solo
2 Eric Olsen 7:47 2190 Master’s Men IL solo
3 Todd Pownell 7:23 2100 Master’s Men OH solo
4 Raccoongainer (Alexis) 7:33 2040 Master’s Men PA solo
5 The Wandering Rocks 6:22 1440 Master’s Men NY team
6 Yaki Barak 7:50 1400 Master’s Men PA solo
7 Bob Turanchik 7:43 1390 Master’s men OH solo
8 Feral Children 7:50 1210 Master’s Men NY/OH team
9 Salamander 4:01 1100 Master’s Men OH team
10 John Rogers 7:03 1090 Master’s Men OH solo
1 Running with Samson 7:33 2100 Master’s Mixed . team
2 Thunder Road 7:47 1850 Master’s Mixed OH team
3 Bee-Ringer 7:36 1640 Master’s Mixed PA team
4 Klemo 7:42 1200 Master’s Mixed . team
5 Damselfly 7:25 780 Master’s Mixed OH team
1 Campbell Rabbits 7:51 1630 Master’s Women VA team
2 Kathy Jo Rufner 7:28 1200 Master’s Women OH solo
1 Stephen Tarry 7:55 2050 Veteran Men NH solo
2 Phast Generation 7:47 2020 Veteran men VT team
3 Steve Johnson 7:42 1860 Veteran men OH solo
1 B & O trekkers 7:44 1550 Veteran Men MD/OH team
2 Phillip Wadsworth 7:55 1490 Veteran Men OH solo
3 Jay Williams 7:25 680 Veteran Men OH solo
4 Richard Davies 7:42 680 Veteran Men OH solo
1 Nightcrawlers 7:57 1680 Veteran Mixed NY team
1 Backtrackers 7:25 780 Veteran Women NY team

 

2016 Python 6 hour overall ranking

Place  Name Time in Score  Class State
1 Logan and Williams 1:55 1010 elite men MI
2 Mlalden Kolar 1:47 950 elite men IL
3 Brian Komoroski 1:31 940 elite men PA
4 Shimizu Shinichi 1:37 880 veteran men OH
5 the 75%ers 1:41 750 Master’s men OH
6 Mark Potter 1:54 740 Master’s men OH
7 Cold Zone 1:44 680 Master’s men OH
8 Fred Mailey 1:50 650 veteran men OH
9 Pics and Hicks 1:40 630 Master’s mixed OH
10 Campbell Lizards 1:55 630 Master’s men VA
11 Alex Giardini 1:30 620 Master’s men OH
12 Looney Tunes 1:03 560 Master’s mixed OH
13 A & L 1:36 500 Master’s mixed OH
14 Hazelton 1:43 480 elite men PA
15 Matthew Johnson 1:59 480 elite men OH
16 Old Men Walking 1:31 470 veteran mixed OH
17 OHPA 1:55 420 Master’s men OH
18 John Blakemore 12:46 350 veteran men OH
19 Sanae Rodgers 1:45 280 Master’s Women OH
20 Bustus 1:36 250 Master’s mixed OH

2016 Python 6 hour by category

Place  Name Time in Score  Class State
1 Logan and Williams 1:55 1010 elite men MI
2 Mlalden Kolar 1:47 950 elite men IL
3 Brian Komoroski 1:31 940 elite men PA
4 Hazelton 1:43 480 elite men PA
5 Matthew Johnson 1:59 480 elite men OH
1 the 75%ers 1:41 750 Master’s men OH
2 Mark Potter 1:54 740 Master’s men OH
3 Cold Zone 1:44 680 Master’s men OH
4 Campbell Lizards 1:55 630 Master’s men VA
5 Alex Giardini 1:30 620 Master’s men OH
6 OHPA 1:55 420 Master’s men OH
1 Pics and Hicks 1:40 630 Master’s mixed OH
2 Looney Tunes 1:03 560 Master’s mixed OH
3 A & L 1:36 500 Master’s mixed OH
4 Bustus 1:36 250 Master’s mixed OH
1 Sanae Rodgers 1:45 280 Master’s Women OH
1 Shimizu Shinichi 1:37 880 veteran men OH
2 Fred Mailey 1:50 650 veteran men OH
3 John Blakemore 12:46 350 veteran men OH
1 Old Men Walking 1:31 470 veteran mixed OH

2016 Python 3 hour overall ranking

 Name Time Score penalty Total
Tom Svobodny 3:39 800 390 410
Guy Russ 2:58 300 300
Jame Price 2:51 280 280
M-TRI 2:51 280 280
Matthew and Allison 3:00 250 250
Karen Birt 2:52 210 210
Team Mountain Toes 2:52 170 170
Burden 3:01 170 10 160
Vera Yudovina 3:05 210 50 160
Captain UK and Captain USA 2:56 160 160
Mathesin and Bradtke 2:58 150 150
Eric and Diane Schultz 2:38 130 130
Greg Marjenin 2:16 110 110
Mama Bears Amanda and Patti 2:59 100 100
Shannon and Query 2:55 100 100
David Steckner 2:05 80 80
John and Serena Naizer 1:44 80 80
Team Into The Woods 2:49 60 60
Time Feaser 0:48 40 40
Thomas Horvath 2:23 30 30
Troop 262 1:06 190 60 130
Tom Loya 2:46 170 170
Team The Newbies 3:03 90 30 60
Frank Mahne 3:33 280 330 -50

ROUTEGADGET

PHOTOS

NOW CASTING – Families living off-grid / Referrals Welcome

Homesteading opportunity, via email to NEOOC:

Attention All Homesteaders. If you’re living a self-sustaining lifestyle, we want to hear from you. Metal Flowers Media is searching Nationwide for diverse families that are attempting their dream of living off-grid.

We are looking for families and/or large communities who generate their own electrical power, food, shelter and water or are working towards that goal. Tell us how well you’re thriving and the hardships you’ve been facing in this new way of life.

If selected, a homesteading expert will work with you to enhance your experience and help you succeed in living your dream. If you fit the bill or know somebody pursuing this courageous lifestyle, please contact Metal Flowers Media at Katy@metalflowersmedia.com.

Katy Cleve
Junior Casting Producer
Metal Flowers Media, LLC

Quail Hollow Night-O / October 22, 6 PM Registration

ABOUT

Join us for orienteering at night (dusk, at least!). Bring a headlamp, and be ready to maneuver through the woods as it gets darker in the evening.

Courses include WHITE, YELLOW, ORANGE, and GREEN.

REGISTRATION & FEES

Registration starts at 6 PM, with starts at dusk. Headlamp recommended.

  • NEOOC Members – $5
  • Non-Members – $10
  • Extra Maps – $3

STAFF

  • Course Designer – John Rasinski
  • Event Director – Rich Davies
  • Registrar – Karen Birt

LOCATION

WEATHER


SAMPLE MAP

1:10,000 / 3 meter contours

Quail Hollow Sample Map