Spring Forward! Short Courses @ Manatoc / 19 MAR 2016

Event Description

Wake up your body! Come run some short and fun courses at beautiful Manatoc. You can run one, or all three. Each course is quick, fast, and will let you ease in to this year’s orienteering schedule.

Date & Time

  • Saturday, March 19, 2016
  • Registration 11:30, with starts at 12 Noon.

Location

Manatoc Scout Camp in Cuyahoga Valley
1075 Truxell Rd, Peninsula, OH 44264

Camp Manatoc Parking and Start

Registration Details

  • Registration starts at 11:30ish, with starts at 12 Noon
  • $5 / member
  • $10 / non-member
  • Run as many courses as you want!

Courses

3 short, fun, high energy courses are available (1.5km – 1.9km) as well as a 60 minute score course for 635 points. Run one, or run them all!

Course Designer(s): Bob Boltz, Andreas Johansson, Sanae Rogers

Sample Map

Sample map ONLY – does not show actual courses!

Manatoc Sample Map

Course Design Workshop Resources / 27 FEB 2016

Here are the resources for the NEOOC Course Design Workshop on 27 February, 2016.

Handouts

Downloads

Slides

Sample Map Files

  • Kenston Campus Map 4000 2016 (download this file, then rename it to “Kenston Campus Map 4000 2016.ocd – no need to unzip – just rename the file, and use with Purple Pen (above))

Reference Documents

 

Mapping: 3D Laser Scans of Britain Reveal Ancient Roman Roads

LIDAR

For the past 18 years, the U.K.’s Environment Agency has used a remote sensing methodcalled LIDAR (short for Light Detection and Ranging) to scan and map 72 percent of England’s surface. The 3D terrain images are used to monitor changing coastlines and model floods. But the maps recently revealed something else: an exciting archaeological find. Within the images, experts spotted miles upon miles of ancient Roman roads that may date back as far as the first century CE.

Roman squads who invaded Britain in 43 CE constructed a series of roads that crisscrossed the country, allowing soldiers to travel hundreds of miles to far-flung forts and settlements. These routes helped solidify Rome’s control over the country’s native Celtic tribes. While some of these paths remain today, many eroded over the centuries, or were obscured by new structures or vegetation.

History buffs regularly search for these “lost” routes, the Times of London reports. Among that group was a 70-year-old retired road engineer named David Ratledge, who has spent almost five decades researching vanished highways in the northwest county of Lancashire.

After the Environment Agency made its LIDAR data sets public via the Survey Open Data Website in 2013, Ratledge examined the maps and spotted a Roman road that connects the towns of Ribchester and Lancaster. According to LiveScience, he previously spent years looking for this particular route, to no avail. Thanks to LIDAR —which can detect differences in the land’s height as little as five centimeters (about 2 inches)—the mystery was finally solved.

“Previously in Lancashire we only had aerial photographs from the 1940s and 1960s to go on, but with photographs features only show up after a drought and we don’t get many of those!” Ratledge said in a press release. “With LIDAR, once you know what to look for, it’s blindingly obvious—you just know you’ve found a road.”

Meanwhile, two archaeologists, Hugh Toller and Bryn Gethin, have used LIDAR data to locate other lost highways, including swaths of a Roman route called the Maiden Way. The Maiden Way once connected the village of Kirkby Thore—which was home to a Roman cavalry camp—with a Roman fort in Low Borrowbridge, Cumbria. Eventually, Toller and Gethin hope to find even more Roman roads using images captured by remote sensing technology. These discoveries may help historians gain a fuller understanding of how Rome once conquered and controlled England.

via http://mentalfloss.com/article/75298/3d-laser-scans-britain-reveal-ancient-roman-roads

It’s cold outside! 5 Tips for How to Stay Warm

“Don’t get cold in the first place.”

Winter has finally joined us, with a frigid -2F / -19C today (14 FEB 2016), to celebrate a frosty Valentine’s Day in Ohio. Here are science-based 5 tips for how to keep warm while enjoying the outdoors, whether that’s running, orienteering, hiking, or just playing in the snow!

1. Stay dry

In an interview with the Calgary Herald, globe-trotting adventurer Sharon Wood revealed her golden rule for keeping warm (and therefore alive) in less-than-kind wintry climates: “Don’t get cold in the first place.”

That’s obvious, you say. But is it? The cold can sneak up on you, especially if you’re tromping through icy puddles or sweating in that big parka. So stay dry, especially by dressing in layers. Backpacker recommends layering with a “synthetic, wicking base layer to pull the moisture off your skin.” Then on top of that, you’ll need a layer that insulates. Base layers — tights, leggings, form-fitting undershirts, etc. — are lightweight, easy to throw on underneath your normal work clothes, and most importantly, keep you toasty with minimal discomfort. Try not to let cotton (which can absorb sweat) touch your skin, if you can help it.

2. Protect your core

The average human core temperature is 98.6 degrees Fahrenheit; hypothermia occurs when body temp dips below 95 degrees. Obviously, keeping your torso insulated is the best thing you can do to keep the rest of you warm and humming along, especially if you pack on a few extra winter pounds.

For example, when people lose fingers, toes, and other extremities to frostbite, at work is one of the body’s natural self-preservation systems: It simply stops sending blood out in order to protect the vital organs. So, as counterintuitive as it sounds, keeping your torso warm is the number one way to keep your hands and feet feeling warm, too. (More on that in a bit.)

3. The “winter hat” might be a myth

Good news for people with great hair: The assumption that 70 percent of a person’s body heat escapes through their head is patently false. University of Michigan professor Andrew Maynard debunks the popular “dancing naked with a winter hat” myth, and explains that body-heat loss relates to “how much skin is exposed, not which part of the body you’re exposing.” That said, wearing a warm hat can and definitely will help you keep warm. (The more skin you cover up the better.) But a hat shouldn’t be depended on in lieu of down coat or jacket with good insulation.

4. Mittens keep your hands warmer than gloves

Protecting your core should be your number one priority. But you need to cover your skin to keep it from getting frostbitten. Remember: The less skin you have exposed the better. If you don’t mind having less mobility in the cold, mittens may be preferable to gloves, since clustering the fingers together helps to produce more insulating body heat.

5. Drink water

Summit-trekking adventurers agree: Water is actually “amazing” for retaining body heat. Simply put, the more you have in your system, the easier it is to keep warm. Stay hydrated — especially before you dash out into the frozen slush every morning.

via http://theweek.com/articles/453487/how-keep-warm-outside-5-sciencebased-tips

Introduction to Orienteering @ Sippo Lake / 23 FEB 2016

Looking for a challenging and fun outdoor activity? Try Orienteering! Join Stark Parks for an introduction to this family of sports requiring the use of a map and compass to navigate from point to point through a variety of diverse and unfamiliar terrains. We’ll cover navigational techniques, orienteering lingo, and introduce you to ways in which you can participate in this fun, family friendly activity.

6-7:30pm at the Exploration Gateway, Sippo Lake Park.
5712 12th St NW, Canton, OH 44708, USA